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Faculty

The UW Department of Rehabilitation Medicine’s Division of Physical Therapy has an outstanding faculty with extensive clinical and research expertise in physical therapy. To learn about the valuable research being done by faculty, see the Research page.

Cristine Agresta

Cristine Agresta is a physical therapist and assistant professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. She is interested in studying determinants of physical resilience, longevity and performance sustainability in athletes and physically active individuals. Her research focuses on utilizing wearables and out-of-lab technology to improve assessment and monitoring techniques in real-world settings. She has a master's in physical therapy from Youngstown State University and a Ph.D. in Movement Science from Temple University and also completed a postdoctoral fellowship in kinesiology at the University of Michigan.

Published research | cagresta@uw.edu


Mary Beth Brown

May Beth Brown began in Rehabilitation Medicine at UW in December 2018, after serving as faculty in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at Indiana University (IU) where she was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure.  Her most recent research has focused on exercise responses in patients and rat models of pulmonary vascular disease.  Prior to her first faculty position, Beth was a NIH T32 post-doctoral fellow in IU Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine where she investigated the role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in pulmonary endothelial barrier breach, and performed novel intravital 2-photon microscopy of rodent lung. Her doctoral dissertation work investigated mechanisms and consequences of high sweat sodium loss during exercise in healthy individuals and in patients with cystic fibrosis. Prior to academia, Beth practiced for almost a decade as a licensed physical therapist, primarily in a hospital-based outpatient setting as a staff therapist and as clinic director. Beth received her Ph.D. in Applied Physiology at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Published research | mbbrown1@uw.edu


Kathleen Cummer

Kathleen Cummer is a physical therapist and lecturer in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Kathleen teaches and assists in orthopedic courses such as musculoskeletal clinical management, kinesiology, modalities and basic procedures. She previously taught in a physical therapist assistant program and managed the program as its director. Kathleen's doctoral work focused on return-to-sport after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in the athletic population. She received her DPT from Ithaca College and Ph.D. from the University of Delaware.

kcummer@uw.edu


Lisa Barton Diller

Lisa Barton Diller is a physical therapist and a teaching associate in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. She works as a physical therapist at an outpatient clinic treating patients with orthopedic and neurologic diagnoses, and in private practice serving patients with residual impairments related to neurologic diagnoses. Her clinical interests include working with patients with neurologic impairments across the life span and helping them meet their changing needs. She has worked with a variety of patient diagnoses in acute, rehab, sub-acute, home health, outpatient and transitional living settings. Lisa has a B.S. in physical therapy from Texas Women’s University and a MMSc in clinical neuroscience physical therapy from Emory University.

lbdiller@uw.edu


Heather Feldner

Heather Feldner is a physical therapist and an assistant professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. A board-certified pediatric clinical specialist, she specializes in working with pediatric populations in inpatient, outpatient and community outreach settings and with children and families living with neurologic, genetic or orthopedic conditions. She also has a special interest in low- and high-tech positioning and mobility technology for children with mobility impairments. In her research, Heather has focused on the intersections of disability, mobility technology and community accessibility and participation in children with disabilities and their families. She is the director of the Impact Collaboratory, an interdisciplinary lab that fosters community partnerships to enable research that contributes important insights into issues such as accessibility, mobility and inclusion. She is also the co-director of Go Baby Go Seattle, a community-based mobility and socialization program that provides safety and accessibility modifications to commercially available toy ride-on cars for young children with disabilities. Heather has a master’s in physical therapy from Marquette University and a Ph.D. in disability studies and a certificate in assistive technology from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She completed a postdoctoral research position in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Washington.

Full profilehfeldner@uw.edu


Torey Gilbertson

Torey Gilbertson is a lecturer in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. In the DPT program, he teaches primarily in the anatomy, kinesiology, pediatrics and modalities courses. He is a board certified specialist in pediatric physical therapy and is interested in the use of technology and gaming to improve movement in children with disabilities. Torey received a DPT from Pacific University and a Ph.D. in rehabilitation science from the University of Washington.

Full profile | Published research | gilbet@uw.edu


Shawn Israel

Shawn Israel is a physical therapist and a clinical teaching assistant in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. In the DPT program, she teaches primarily in the pediatrics and applied neuroscience courses. She also does outreach in high schools and colleges to those considering PT careers. Shawn works as a physical therapist at an outpatient pediatric clinic and has experience working as a PT in preschools, in birth to age three programs for children with disabilities and delays, and with adults and children with cancer. She is also interested in global health and has mentored and trained students and physical therapists in the Dominican Republic and Guatemala. Shawn received her DPT from the University of Washington.

Full profile smisrael@uw.edu 


Jill Jandreau

Jill Jandreau is a physical therapist and a teaching associate in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Jill has a broad clinical background, including experience in orthopedics and neurology across the life span in acute care, acute rehab, outpatient, home health and industrial settings. She has a special interest in ergonomics and women’s health. In the DPT program, Jill is the primary instructor in the first-year acute care practice course and the pathophysiology courses, and assists in multiple other courses. She has a MS in physical therapy from the University of Rhode Island.

Full profilejandreau@uw.edu 


Laura Johnstone

Laura Johnstone is a physical therapist and a teaching associate in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. In the DPT program, she teaches and assists in a variety of courses. Laura has more than a decade of clinical experience, including a focus on acute care physical therapy at the University of Washington Medical Center and outpatient physical therapy at Edmonds Orthopedic Physical Therapy. Johnstone has an MPT degree from the University of Washington.

lmj@uw.edu


Deborah Kartin

Deborah Kartin is a physical therapist and a professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. She is also the director of the interdisciplinary PhD program in Rehabilitation Science. As a physical therapist and researcher, she specializes in infants and children who have or are at risk for developmental disabilities. Deborah has a BS in physical therapy from Boston University and a MS in rehabilitation medicine and a Ph.D. in education from the University of Washington.

Full profile | Published researchkartin@uw.edu 


Valerie Kelly

Valerie Kelly is a physical therapist and an associate professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. She is a co-director of the Amplifying Movement and Performance (AMP) Laboratory, a collaborative facility run by the College of Engineering and the School of Medicine that seeks to amplify human and robotic movement and performance. In addition, Valerie is also a didactic faculty member in the Neurologic Physical Therapy Residency Program. In her physical therapy practice, she specializes in treating people with neurologic disorders, particularly Parkinson's disease. In her research, Valerie studies the interaction between cognitive impairments and mobility in a variety of neurologic populations, with an emphasis on people who have Parkinson's disease. Current projects examine the impact of cognitive impairment and genetic variants on gait and the response to gait rehabilitation in people who have Parkinson's disease. Valerie has an MS in physical therapy and a Ph.D. in movement science from Washington University in St. Louis.

Full profile | Published research | vekelly@uw.edu 


Stacia Lee

Stacia Lee is a physical therapist and clinical teaching assistant in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. She has almost 30 years of clinical experience, primarily with neurologic patients, her area of passion. She is an APTA board-certified neurologic clinical specialist. In addition to her clinical practice, Stacia also has nearly 20 years of supervisory and managerial experience in a large academic medical center. She has been actively involved in establishing the first two physical therapy residencies at the UW. Stacia has a BS in physical therapy from Boston University.

staciale@uw.edu


Murray Maitland

Murray Maitland is a physical therapist and an associate professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. In his clinical work, Murray specializes in musculoskeletal dysfunction caused by overuse, trauma and disease. His research focuses on the clinical biomechanics of musculoskeletal injury, particularly relating to joint replacement and artificial limbs. Murray has a BSR in physical therapy and occupational therapy and an MS in anatomy from the University of British Columbia and a Ph.D. in medical science from the University of Calgary.

Full profile | Published researchmmaitlan@uw.edu 


Patricia Matsuda

Patti Matsuda is a physical therapist and an acting assistant professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Her clinical expertise is in the neurorehabilitation of patients with neurologic diagnoses and the treatment of older adults with balance and musculoskeletal problems. Her research focuses on falls and fall prevention in older adults and those with neurologic diagnoses. In the DPT program, she teaches courses in the neurologic and life span tracks. She is currently the faculty adviser to the interdisciplinary UW Fall Prevention Team, which organizes fall prevention events in the greater Seattle area. The team is comprised of students from the UW DPT and Occupational Therapy programs, UW School of Pharmacy and the Group Health Optometry Residency Program. Patti has a BS in physical therapy from the University of Washington, a transitional clinical doctorate in physical therapy from A.T. Still University, Arizona School of Health Sciences, and a Ph.D. in rehabilitation science from the University of Washington.

Full profile | Published researchpmatsuda@uw.edu 


Sarah ("Sally") Westcott McCoy

Sally Westcott McCoy is a physical therapist, a professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and the head of the Division of Physical Therapy. In addition to teaching in the DPT program, Sally mentors students on research and clinical projects related to pediatric physical therapy. As a researcher, her interests include evaluation of pediatric interventions, longitudinal development of children with cerebral palsy, and the use of technology and gaming devices in motor learning interventions for children with cerebral palsy and development coordination disorder. Sally has an MPT and a Ph.D. in behavioral neurosciences from the University of Washington.

Full profile | Published researchwestcs@uw.edu 


Janis McCullough

Janis McCullough is a physical therapist and a teaching associate in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. She has 15 years of clinical experience in outpatient orthopedic settings with a focus on treatment of spine and extremity conditions. She is a certified orthopedic manual therapist (COMT) through NAIOMT and a board-certified orthopedic specialist (OCS) through APTA. Janis has a DPT in physical therapy from the University of Nebraska and a BS in occupational therapy from the University of British Columbia. 

janismcc@uw.edu


Ellen McGough

Ellen McGough is a physical therapist and associate professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Ellen teaches therapeutic exercise and seminar topics. She is also the didactic director of the acute care residency program. Her research focuses on the early markers of disability and the effects of exercise on motor and non-motor function in adults with neurodegenerative disease. As a physical therapist, she has experience in acute care, musculoskeletal, neurologic and geriatric physical therapy. Ellen earned a BS in physical therapy from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and a MEd and a Ph.D. in nursing sciences from the University of Washington.

Full profile | Published researchemcg@uw.edu 


Kevin McQuade

Kevin McQuade is an associate professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. His research interests include factors that influence joint stability and methods for quantifying manual therapy techniques. Kevin received his BS in Physical Therapy from California State University, Long Beach, his MPH at the University of Washington and his Ph.D. in Exercise Science from the University of Iowa. He completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Maryland studying the biomechanics of shoulder injury in manual wheelchair users.

Full profilekmcquade@uw.edu 


Chet Moritz

Chet Moritz is an associate professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. In addition to teaching in the DPT program, Chet mentors students in research. As the principal investigator of the Moritz Lab, he’s working to develop neuroprosthetic technology for the treatment of paralysis and other movement disorders. Chet has a Ph.D. in integrative biology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Full profile | Published researchctmoritz@uw.edu 


Mark Nelson

Mark Nelson is a physical therapist and a clinical teaching assistant in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. In the DPT program, he assists teaching the acute care and exercise physiology courses. Mark has clinical experience in inpatient, outpatient and acute care settings. He has an MA in physical therapy from the University of Puget Sound.

mnelson4@uw.edu


Sujata Pradhan

Sujata Pradhan is a physical therapist and an associate professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Her clinical interest is in the evaluation and treatment of neurologic deficits in older adults. Her research focuses on using technology to develop objective measures and design interventions for people with Parkinson’s disease. She has an MS in physical therapy and a Ph.D. in rehabilitation science from the University of Pittsburgh.

Full profile | Published research | sujatap@uw.edu 


Cynthia Robinson

Cyndi Robinson is a senior lecturer in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and the director of the Division of Physical Therapy’s clinical education and service learning programs. Cyndi has more than 15 years of patient care experience, including trauma care, burn rehabilitation and wound care. She is a proponent for early mobility in the intensive care and acute care settings. As a credentialed trainer in the American Physical Therapy Association’s Credentialed Clinical Instructor Program, Cyndi trains clinical instructors throughout the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. In her research, Cyndi is most interested in identifying factors and community-based exercise programs that affect participation in the community. Cyndi also has an interest in global health and has lectured at health care facilities, medical schools and conferences in Peru, Moldova and Russia. She has a BS in physical therapy from Ithaca College, an MS in adult neurologic rehabilitation from Long Island University and a Ph.D. in rehabilitation science from the University of Washington.

Full profilecyndirob@uw.edu 


Sean Rundell

Sean Rundell is a physical therapist, epidemiologist and an assistant professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. He conducts epidemiologic and health services research of musculoskeletal conditions, with a focus on low back pain and chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions in older adults. Sean earned his DPT degree from Duke University and an MS and Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Washington School of Public Health. He completed the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Orthopedic Physical Therapy residency in 2007, and he was a K12 Scholar in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality from 2014 to 2016.

Full profile | Published research | srundell@uw.edu 


Megan Scudder

Megan Scudder is a physical therapist and a teaching associate in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. She has more than 28 years of clinical experience in outpatient and inpatient settings, with a focus on treating orthopedic musculoskeletal rehabilitation and neurologic pathologies such as stroke, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Her research interests include the neuroscience of chronic pain and gait and balance retraining. Megan has a B.S. in physical therapy from the University of Washington.

Full profilescuddm@uw.edu 

Bernadette Williams-York

Bernadette Williams-York’s research, teaching and service interests have focused around the area of health disparities/inequities and health promotion in underserved older adult populations. She has explored disparities related to health care access and utilization by underrepresented minorities, as well as factors that play a role in disparate health outcomes. In addition, as a licensed physical therapist for over 30 years, Bernadette has worked in multiple health care settings with diverse patient populations, including geriatric home care, acute hospital care, assisted living and long term care facilities. Her clinical expertise with primarily a geriatric population has earned her recognition as a certified specialist in geriatric physical therapy through the American Physical Therapy Association. Her research interests have been primarily focused on workforce diversity in physical therapy and health promotion in older adults. 

yorkbern@uw.edu